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CREWS 10: Hybrid Handbook – A Workplace Guide

Alpha, Beta & Gamma – A Fable

THE NEW VISION & MISSION: INTRODUCTION
This is an essential moment in the relatively modern field known as real estate and facilities management. We prefer the term “CREWS” for Corporate Real Estate, Workplace & Services. This reflects corporate status, and a role as a provider of workplace and services, rather than a maintainer of bricks and mortar. An ever-expanding range of serious responsibilities is calling for New Vision, Mission, and Models for the field, such as:
• Security and cybersecurity against terrorist threats
• New environmental, social, and governance policies
• Worker safety and wellness during a global pandemic
• Hybrid workplace strategy in the post-pandemic world
• Artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT)
We now face an unprecedented dilemma: Many professionals are unsure how to begin post-Covid initiatives. Like us, you have probably endured dozens of webinars, Zoom sessions, and teleconferences and read books, articles, and editorials about getting things right for the returning workforce. Yet some individuals report successful working conditions that are entirely at variance with the advice.

So what is the right workplace solution? Pre-pandemic plans with changes? Remote workforce? Hybrid Office?

We believe each company, even each facility, can make the decisions for themselves with little assistance from external experts. The secret is knowing how to measure, track and demonstrate steady progress. To clarify these processes, we will refer back to methods from previous chapters. Building on this foundation, we will show how to combine these methods and develop your solution tailored to your facilities and needs.

As you implement your Hybrid Workplace, we recommend comparing your progress with other firms using the forms available here. There is no cost, and your individual company’s data remains confidential.

HYBRID HANDBOOK: A WORKPLACE GUIDE
This guide completes a series of articles published by Guerin Associates (GA) over recent months under the title: CREWS: THE NEW VISION & MISSION - Models for Corporate Real Estate, Workplace & Services. We refer back to parts of those published issues at certain points, so here are links to what we’ve issued so far:

The main point of a Hybrid Workplace is to attain the optimal balance of on- and off-site work, and thereby address the needs of CREWS, the Business, and the Workers. The objective of this Handbook is to help CREWS professionals optimize their own facilities through a data-based approach. To highlight some of the key elements of the optimization process, we are providing the following aids in BLUE FONT:

HYBRID HINTS – Suggestions to Make Optimization More Effective (See HINT on the next page)
OPTIMIZATION STEPS # – A Numbered Sequence of Steps to Optimize Your Workplace
OPTIMIZATION FORMS # – Excel Files Made Available to Use in Compiling Your Data, and submitting to Guerin Assocs. if you want confidential comparisons with other firms.

CREWS Photo
Crews 3 & 6
Hybrid Hint

Large amounts of real estate remain unoccupied and may remain so for months. The “Burn Rate” of vacant, unproductive space is staggering. It has been accepted in part due to the difficulty and cost of replacing this space in the future, and uncertainties regarding new variants of Covid.

Three major developments make the continued need for this space less likely.
1. Employees prefer working from home, at least part-time. Hence the popularity of the “Hybrid” model workplaces, and the strong likelihood of excess space in many portfolios.

2. New models for ownership, management, and tenancy are making wide-scale use of “flex-space” (or coworking) more convenient. This allows landlords and tenants to design lease matching needs more closely than today’s typical portfolio.

3. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and space usage apps make the option of real-time, on-demand space a practical reality. This can free large amounts of space for disposition, subleasing, or higher, better use.

These trends require a bigger picture of the workplace, and insight into the key elements for highly productive, cost-effective use. We begin our quest in this material with New Lessons From Benchmarking.

The following charts illustrate some of the unsustainable changes brought about by the global pandemic.

Participants in the latest Facilities Forum® 2021 study reported an Average Assigned Occupancy of 65.2%.
Estimated Actual Occupancy averaged 10%, with 90% vacancy during normal business hours …

Occupancy Vacancy Rates

Actual RSF per Occupant averaged 2,795, versus the nominal figure of 368 RSF per Assigned Occupant …

RDF Per Assigned Occupant

… and unassigned vacancies produced a “Burn Rate” total of $374 Million for the year in underutilized space. Estimated Actual Vacancies (counting all vacancies as underutilized space) cost approximately $975 Million for nine participating firms, or over $100 Million dollars for the average firm in the Facilities Forum® in 2021 study.

Share of CREWS OpEx and Study Year Cost

Facilities, Workplace & Workforce
There is a hierarchy of value among these elements, which can be examined in financial terms.

1. Buildings can cost $400 per Gross Square Foot in initial construction over the course of 1-2 years.

2. Operating costs for a typical office facility can cost $60 per RSF, for Total Costs of Occupancy. This includes Building Services, Workplace Support, Business Services, and Employee Services and Amenities. See “CREWS 9: Prismetrix: Space, Value & Costs,” and “CREWS 3: Services and Organization” for more information. The Total Cost of Occupancy was $22,080 per Employee in our most recent Facilities Forum 2021 Study (2020 Data).

3. Personnel costs exceed Facility Operating Costs. Fortune 500 salaries average $76,722 (SimplyHired). Zip Recruiter reports an average salary in Silicon Valley (the site of most of our study participants) of $89,686.

4. Revenue per Employee averaged $428,143 in Facilities Forum 2021. Revenue per RSF averaged $1,552.

5. Following is a TreeMap illustrating Revenues, Salaries, Profits, and Total Costs of Occupancy per Employee. TCO is a fraction of personnel costs and profits and a very small fraction of revenues.

Employee Revenue
Optimization
Inventory Workplace Assets EBenchmark
Align Assets
Align Assets Facility
Workplace
Workforce Row
Workforce Net
Grand Total

The NEO Ratio (67.1%) shows important possibilities with a Hybrid Model:
• Potential growth capacity for additional workers on-site of 50%
• Opportunity to shed up to one-third of the current workspace
• Increased on-site workers and/or on-site hours per worker
Reduction in the number of current workspaces
Redesign of workspaces for personal distancing
Options to sublease substantial unused space
There are resources to supplement these options. For example, the rapidly increasing use of Flex Space makes subleasing more attractive and lowers the risk of running short of space. Most important, having this kind of information gives decision-makers a basis for planning, founded on actual data, rather than hunches or guesses. Unfortunately, there are not even reliable rules-of-thumb, because the post-Covid era is a new and unprecedented challenge. Another major benefit is the opportunity to show how the CREWS profession meets new challenges, serves as the Home of the Enterprise, and demonstrates a Model of Quality for all.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT
It’s essential to establish measurable goals and achievements, and CREWS managers need up-to-date tools, techniques, and data to guide decisions. This is especially true in the current, post-Covid period of uncertainty. As seen in the introductory charts, the potential costs of underutilized space are substantial, over $100 Million at some firms. Prudent decision-making requires objective, impartial comparisons. Objective data requires consistent definitions and methodologies. We are providing those methods to firms seeking this information.

E - Benchmark

HOW WE CAN HELP
We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of the leaders in their industries, who recognize the advantages of a leadership position. We provide rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of CREWS consulting experience, plus our prior 10+ years’ hands-on knowledge of the field. Firms that want to compare their own performance with others in a confidential way are invited to utilize the forms we have developed. Our core competency since 1996 has been space utilization, and we’ve adapted our approach to include the critical issues brought on by the Covid pandemic. e-benchmark.com is an ideal forum, and the database to help professionals attain the optimal balance of Facilities, Workplace, and Workforce. We hope you will join us in this exciting collaborative effort, offered at no cost for a limited period of time. We will share group results using confidential masking codes with the data. We list the names of the participating firms, but none of their individual data in connection with their company identity. Let us know if you want to participate in e-benchmark.com, or if we can help you in any way.
Mike Guerin
mguerin@guerinassociates.com
908-903-9070

Thank You Crew10

ADDENDUM – NEW TERMS, DEFINITIONS & KEY METRICS

Types of Work

ADDENDUM – SELECTED GUERIN ASSOCIATES CLIENTS SINCE 1996

Since 1996

CREWS 9: Prismetrix – Space, Value & Costs

OVERVIEW

PRISMETRIX: SPACE, VALUE & COSTS
Prismetrix is a comprehensive system of measurements and metrics based on recognized and accepted standards in Corporate Real Estate, Workplace and Services. Using these standards ensures that impartial, “apples-to-apples” comparisons are possible among a large group of diverse firms and facilities. They contain factors which can be normalized to adjust for differences outside the control of the participating organizations. Factors can include climate, local labor & material costs, locally available fuel types and costs, etc.

One of the most critical factors affecting Total Costs of Occupancy is space utilization. Once a building’s footprint is established, changes in the workplace are limited to a fraction of the total square footage. This is why early analysis is critical to achieving high-value design.

The Guerin Prism is the “capstone” of Prismetrix. It is a graphic algorithm that enables detailed analysis of the major elements of building design that drive space utilization. It is a powerful tool for Space Benchmarking and can be applied to a wide range of different building designs to compare their overall efficiency.

This chapter presents the following information:
• Brief overview of Guerin Prism methodology
• Prism Space, Value & Cost Applications
• Importance of the Perimeter Area Ratio
• “Apples-to-Apples” Space Benchmarking
• Potential Savings in CapEx and OpEx
• Case Studies from Guerin Associates

Prism

WHY A PRISM?
The Prism is a near-magical shape with unique features. Its transparent solid volume affects the speed of light passing through, refracting (separating and bending) the light according to its different wavelengths. Long, low-energy red wavelengths are least affected by the material, and pass through with the least angular change. High-energy violet and blue are most affected, and come through with the greatest deflection.

The passage of light is analogous to the hierarchy of space, value & costs in a building. White light represents Net Assignable space or “Building Muscle,” with the highest value and lowest cost. Red (Secondary Circulation) is next, followed by yellow (Support Space) and green (Common Area). Violet and blue light, with higher energy, represent costly Vertical Penetrations, such as exterior walls, columns, stairs, elevators, etc. Building “Skin & Bones” are most expensive to design and build, yet offer the lowest return in terms of business value.

The Prism offers a visual approach to analyzing, understanding, and illustrating how various designs affect the labor, materials, time and money that go into a building, and the actual value that results. High-value design provides the highest return of profitable, business-critical space with the lowest cost-intensive investment.

Light Spectrum
Hierarchy of Space, Value & Cost

GUERIN PRISM METHODOLOGY

Two Major Project Types
Five Major Space Types
Five Major Space Types Part 2

GUERIN PRISM APPLIED

Guerin Prism Algorithm Representation
Prism Logo

The Guerin Prism examines each level of architectural design, to identify gaps with optimal ratios at each level as early as possible. This avoids the need for costly redesign later in design stages, during construction or even after occupancy, when costs of change are prohibitive.

Comparison

1. 27,000 SF less new construction required to satisfy a specific building program and occupancy.
2. 27,000 SF more space within a new facility, available to accommodate additional occupants or uses.
3. Higher levels of occupiable area within an existing building planned for reconfiguration.

Prism Logo

The floor plans below show revisions made to the physical model above with minimal impact on office layout. The plan on the left side contains redundant secondary circulation. Removing the excess circulation improves valuable Net Assignable SF by nearly ten percent.

Building Plan

Potential improvements in space utilization exist in many areas, and most can be identified early in the design process. Once a building’s footprint has been established, however, improvements are limited largely to Net Assignable Workspace and Secondary Circulation, which represent a fraction of the building’s total area.

This is why early analysis is critical to achieving high-value design. One example of an early diagnostic is the Perimeter Area Ratio (PAR), the relationship between a building’s perimeter and its internal floor area, which affects the Gross SF to Net Assignable Workspace Ratio. Here are examples of three different plans and PARs.

Perimeter = 400 LF
Area = 10,000 SF
PAR = 4.0

Basic Office Building Plan

Perimeter = 600 LF
Area = 20,000 SF
PAR = 4.2

Second Basic Office Building Plan

Perimeter = 1,200 LF
Area = 50,000 SF
PAR = 5.4

In addition to the greater inefficiencies of Gross to Net ratios, resulting in less Net Workspace, higher PAR ratios increase the complex, costly exterior walls, glass, stairs,  elevators and structural features.

Higher PARs call for higher justification.

Multiple Rooms Floor Plan

CAPITAL EXPENSE SAVINGS

SAVINGS FROM IMPROVED DESIGN: TOTAL COSTS OF CONSTRUCTION

Capital Expense Savings

OPERATING EXPENSE SAVINGS

LONG-TERM OPERATING SAVINGS OVER THE BUILDING LIFE-CYCLE

Operating Expense Savings

GUERIN PRISM CASE STUDIES

Prism Case Studies

GUERIN ASSOCIATES CLIENTS SINCE 1996

Clients Since 1996

CONCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT
It’s essential to establish measurable goals and achievements. In order to accomplish this, CREWS managers need the most up-to-date tools, techniques and data to guide decisions. This is especially true in benchmarking costs against peer organizations. Prismetrix ensures that Total Costs of Occupancy are based on similar, applesto-apples criteria, equivalent scope and equal depth of analysis.

Objective, impartial data based on consistent definitions is even more important in Space Benchmarking. The Guerin Prism enables this, using definitions based on standards published by ANSI, ASTM, BOMA and IFMA. The case studies cited above illustrate the significant potential financial benefits of applying this methodology.

CREWS: Home of the Enterprise

HOW WE CAN HELP
We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of them leaders in their industries, who recognize the advantages of a leadership position. We provide them with rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of CREWS consulting experience, plus our prior 10+ years’ hands-on knowledge of the field.

Our evaluations show how to raise performance while reducing costs, by establishing and attaining aggressive but achievable goals for the organization. We can provide evaluations tailored to your own portfolio, facilities, workplace, staffing and other management responsibilities, and help you become a best performer.

THANK YOU!

Thank You

CREWS 8: Radar, Value & Other Great Charts

OVERVIEW

RADAR, VALUE & OTHER GREAT CHARTS
Many charts have been used in this series, and most are not repeated here. See Chapters 1 thru 7 for numerous examples of how to illustrate and analyze data, and present conclusions in a streamlined, time-saving way. This “Visual Management” approach affords major advantages presenting findings to varied audiences from senior management to colleagues, employees, service providers and outside parties.

This chapter presents several additional charts, and new information not previously used.
Radar Charts, for example, are excellent vehicles for comprehensive criteria across numerous samples.

  • Overall benchmarking comparisons among companies, sites, or facilities
  • Comprehensive RFI/RFP overview of outsourcing candidate results

Value Charts (CREWS 4: Three Key Dimensions of Value) illustrate the differing interests of stakeholders:

  • Shareholders seek improved investment return through cost control.
  • Employees are most interested in workplace features, services, and amenities.
  • Management seeks optimal balance for sustainable productivity and profit.

Traffic Light Charts allow simultaneous evaluation of numerous functional areas across a range of factors. This permits the identification of whether underperformance is located primarily within a specific functional area (e.g. Maintenance & Operations), or across a number of functional areas in a particular aspect of performance. For example, there may be a need for enhanced training in several areas, indicating a departmental issue.

The following examples represent a brief selection of charts used to enhance the communication of results.

RADAR CHARTS: USED FOR OVERALL COMPARISONS ...

Radar Charts (aka Spider Charts) consolidate multiple criteria for groups of firms, locations, or facilities.

Radar Charts_Overall Comparison

… RFI / RFP CONTRACTOR SELECTION …

Radar Charts compare and analyze RFI & RFP (Requests For Information / Proposals) data. This outsourcing project began with 50+ potential service providers for Maintenance & Operational Services for an organization in the Philadelphia area, with US locations. After surveys, data collection, and analysis, the group was narrowed to the shortlist of eight here, and ultimately to the selected successful company for a global, 7-year contract.

RFI_RFP Contractor Selection

… AND INDIVIDUAL VENDOR ANALYSIS

This view of the data shows an individual bidder (Company A) vs. the group median. This variation allows for inspection of the differences between two or more individual firms, between one firm and median values, etc.

Radar charts make excellent models for illustrating strengths and weaknesses at a glance.

 

Individual Vendor Analysis

VALUE CHARTS ILLUSTRATE DIFFERENT INTERESTS …

Shareholders are most concerned with Return On Equity, which in the short term depends on lowering costs.
Employees in the Workplace are most interested in the features, services, and amenities which improve their environment, well-being, and ability to perform.
Management must strike the optimal balance between these values for sustainable productivity and profit.

Efficiency KPI Scores Graph

… AND IDENTIFY IMPROVEMENT NEEDS …

This Value Chart for Maintenance & Operations shows Total Costs and Key Performance Indicator (KPI) scores.
Each KPI is weighted by importance, with life safety highest and minor repairs and comfort issues rated lowest.
Cost is rated higher than KPIs for this firm (Co. CL). For them, a higher value will require better cost control.

… BASED ON CLEAR IMPROVEMENT TARGETS.

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: MAINTENANCE & OPERATIONS

Shown here are improvement targets required for Company CL, to achieve a performance level of 80.76 out of a possible 100 points. This represents the first of three years of combined cost reductions and service level improvements, in order to achieve the top quartile and Best Performer status.

Improvemet Targets Table

TRAFFIC LIGHT CHARTS

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: MAINTENANCE & OPERATIONS

Quartile colors indicate performance by functional area (Maintenance & Operations, Custodial & Janitorial, etc.) across each of four Critical Success Factors (from a total of seven). Patterns reveal where improvement needs lie within a functional area (e.g. Lab Services), or in a CSF across all areas (e.g. Learning Organization)

Traffic Lights Chart

CONCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

It’s essential to establish measurable goals and achievements. It’s also important to find ways to communicate the messages conveyed by large amounts of data in a clear, compelling way with a minimum of delay.

We have found that charts such as those used in this series are remarkably successful in achieving these goals. They combine the advantages of clarity, through best practices in graphic design, with the benefit of impartiality, which is reinforced through methods of presentation and clarifying analysis.

We welcome your comments or questions on these materials or your suggestions for additional tools and techniques. In an era of increasing volume and speed of incoming data, solutions that simplify its absorption and transmission are of real value. These charts are intended as examples to illustrate that point.

Conclusion

HOW WE CAN HELP

We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of them. leaders in their industries, who recognize the advantages of a leadership position. We provide them with rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of CREWS consulting experience, plus our prior 10+ years’ hands-on knowledge of the field.

Our evaluations show how to raise performance while reducing costs, by establishing and attaining aggressive but achievable goals for the organization. We can provide evaluations tailored to your own portfolio, facilities, workplace, staffing, and other management responsibilities, and help you become the best performer

THANK YOU!

 

 

Thank You Crew 8

CREWS 7: Benchmarking – What, Why & How

OVERVIEW

BENCHMARKING – WHAT, WHY & HOW
What is Benchmarking?

Benchmarking has been defined in various ways. One definition is:
Benchmarking is the methodical comparison of an organization’s data with others, objective analysis of differences in results, identification of opportunities to improve, and an effort to learn from best performers.

Another version is “being confident enough to compare with others, and humble enough to learn from them.”

Benchmarking has numerous analogous processes and comparative information sources. Many of these are so familiar that we fail to recognize the parallels. A few common examples include:

• Comparisons of business results, annual reports, financial analysis, etc.
• Investment advice, risk/return evaluations, prospectus reports, etc.
• Health assessments, BMI index, EKGs, laboratory bloodwork, etc.
• Sports analysis, team rankings, performance evaluations, and projections

These examples have one thing in common: Their value depends on being impartial. When a presentation is an effort to persuade rather than inform, it’s actually a sales process, and “free advice” is rarely free of bias. Benchmarking is more like a fiduciary, whose objective is simply to establish the truth in clear, useful ways

Why engage in benchmarking?

The main reason to participate in benchmarking is to acquire reliable, impartial information on one’s performance from the perspective of an objective source. It’s easy to be deluded about our performance by our own biases or those of others seeking to persuade us to use their product or service.

Another concern is the issue of confidentiality. Using a third party safeguards identities of study participants. This allows sharing of detailed data and increases the accuracy and actionability of results without fear of vulnerability from what is revealed. Confidential “masking codes” make this process secure for all parties.

How can we participate in Benchmarking?
Types of Benchmarking

1. Internal comparisons – Among different regions, campuses, or buildings within a portfolio, for example

2. Peer comparisons – Among similar facilities or campuses within a sector, industry, or business

3. Targeted comparisons – Among specific building areas (e.g., labs) or activities (e.g., HVAC energy use
)

4. Other – Organizations of common interest, such as public sector, academic, urban locale, climate, etc.

Sources of Benchmarking (See Diagram on Next Page)

1. In-House Benchmarking Research – Some organizations assign their own internal staff to conduct benchmarking comparisons. Although convenient, the interpretations of findings may be influenced by desired outcomes (such as maintaining the current organizational structure, for example).

2. Service Provider Data – Benchmarking data is available at little or no cost from service providers. As with In-House findings, results may suggest staying with (or switching to) the service provider reporting.


3. Trade Associations offer objective information, often at a relatively low cost. This information is impartial but may lack important detail, such as local climate, fuel, labor, or material data, or use definitions varying from those of the organization, which is seeking directly applicable information.


4. Objective, Third-Party Sources offer objectivity and impartiality, plus detailed, actionable information.

a. When an organization elects to sponsor a study, it can define the scope and terms used in the study, the areas being reported, peers chosen for comparison, and the methodology used by the consultant.

b. When participating in a study sponsored by another organization, one can often join at no cost, but cannot determine the scope, terms, definitions, or methods used.

c. A consortium study sponsored by a group has the advantage of shared costs, but must coordinate among the sponsors to achieve a consistent scope and schedule compliance. This can be managed by a local trade group chapter, but can also be coordinated cost-effectively by a third-party consultant.

Sources of Benchmarking Diagram
How do we obtain “apples-to-apples” comparisons?

One of the chief advantages of outside sources, such as trade associations and third parties, is their use of consistent definitions. This ensures that all data collected is based upon the same scope and level of detail.

Example: Maintenance & Operations – Cost Definitions

Reported costs include all maintenance, repair, operation of the building(s) and equipment. This includes roofs, walls, mechanical equipment, elevators, electrical, fire extinguishers and systems, life safety and security systems, building controls, maintenance (CMMS) and automation systems (BAS), painting and finishes, building and site signage, furniture repair, all bulb replacement, indoor plants, pest control, routine waste management and recycling (net costs).

Internal labor and costs include maintenance shops. (Note if materials management is included.) Include any exterior wall cleaning, although window cleaning should be included with Custodial.

Outsource costs include all service contracts for HVAC, elevator, other, etc. Labor for cogeneration operation should be reported with Utilities labor costs. Note in Remarks any extraordinary expenses, such as unplanned repairs exceeding $50,000 which occur less than once per year. It also includes projects such as equipment replacement in kind, minor construction, or supporting services such as air quality testing, air balancing, infrared, vibration analysis or electrical system diagnosis.

Supplies and Materials includes:
Small tools, uniforms, maintenance materials, repair & replacement parts, etc.


Excluded from reported costs: Large vehicles and fuels, registrations, etc.


Capital project costs are reported with Design & Construction.

How do we measure performance?

While Cost is relatively straightforward, measuring Performance requires establishment of the key metrics to be used, the units of measurement and the weighting of each performance area relative to the others.

Example: Maintenance & Operations – Key Performance Indicators & Targets.

Maintenance & Operations Table

Show here are improvement targets required for a specific client (Company CL) to achieve a performance level of 80.76 out of a possible 100 points. This represents the first of three years of combined cost reductions and service level improvements in order to achieve the top quartile for Value and Best Performer status.

THE PROCESS

What is the Benchmarking Process?

Here is a generic diagram of two approaches to reviewing organizational performance results:
A. Annual Data vs. Last Year Results; and/or B. Benchmarking Comparisons vs. Peer Firms & Facilities

Benchmark Process Diagram

SPACE UTILIZATION IS A CRITICAL KEY METRIC

Space Distribution Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

FIXED AND VARIABLE COSTS

Fixed and Variable Costs Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

TOTAL COST OF OCCUPANCY AS A PERCENT OF REVENUE (CPRD)

Total CREWS Costs Share Graph of Revenue

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

AND OUTSOURCED STAFFING BY OCCUPANCY

Outsourced CREWS Staff per 1000 Assigned Occupants Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

BREAKDOWNS OF IN-HOUSE STAFFING BY BUILDING AREA

In-House CREWS Staff per 100K RSF Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

RATES & COSTS OF SUB-UTILIZATION

Burn Rate Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

CAPITAL SPENDING / REVENUE RATIOS

Facility CapEx Share of Company Revenue Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

REGIONAL LOCATIONS

Ratios of Locations by Region Graph

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

CONCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

It’s essential to establish measurable goals and achievements. Equally important is the need to ensure that these goals are both aggressive and realistically achievable. One way to strike the optimal balance between these opposing poles is to see what similar companies are achieving for their organizations.

This is especially true of direct competitors, where their lower costs may pose a threat to your own firm’s market competitiveness, while higher levels of performance (in employee amenities provided, for example) can represent a major threat in today’s highly competitive labor market.

Benchmarking directs improvement efforts into the most important areas. Where you are doing well, report this clearly to management; where you are fair, plan reasonable improvements; and if/where you perform poorly, seize the opportunity to set ambitious goals, reorganize programs and redesign key processes.

Benchmarking can introduce opportunities to establish robust new goals, envision and develop successful organizations, and adopt best practices, by learning from best performers in the study group and the industry.

Home of the Enterprise and Model of Value
HOW WE CAN HELP

We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of the leaders in their industries, who recognize the advantages of a leadership position. We provide them with rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of CREWS consulting experience, plus our prior 10+ years’ hands-on knowledge of the field.

Our evaluations show how to raise performance while reducing costs by establishing and attaining aggressive but achievable goals for the organization. We can provide evaluations tailored to your own portfolio, facilities, workplace, staffing, and other management responsibilities and help you become the best performer.

THANK YOU!

Thank You Message

TO BENCHMARK YOUR ORGANIZATION ON THIS OR OTHER CHARTS, CONTACT US THRU “MORE INFO.”

CREWS 6: Three Key Dimensions Of Total Value

OVERVIEW

THREE KEY DIMENSIONS OF TOTAL VALUE
Do we have a clear understanding of:

• What Value actually is?
• Why Value is more important than cost?
• How to measure, achieve and demonstrate value?

We are all familiar with commercials that announce tremendous opportunities to acquire value. This often means that a given product or service is available at a lower cost, perhaps “for a limited time only.” A better definition of Value, one that explains its importance in business, is a measure of the Ratio of three factors:

1. Quality (Effectiveness)
2. Speed (Efficiency)
3. Cost (Economy)

As noted in the previous chapter, this is sometimes described as “good, fast and cheap.” If we add the dimension of Quantity (or Volume), to calculate a cost per unit of goods or services, the formula for Value can be expressed informally as:

Value FormulaNote: Each factor is weighted differently by each organization.

 

Example: One SF of goods or services (say, cleaning) provided at 90% effectiveness (90% completely clean), at a cost of $3.00 (within the specified frequency or timing) has a Value Cost of $3.33 per SF cleaned. Reducing this Value Cost to $3.00 per clean SF is achieved by raising completion to 100%, or lowering the cost to $2.70.

Similar calculations can be performed for cleaning frequencies. Total Value is calculated by including all of these factors and assigning different weights to each. This enables “apples-to-apples” comparisons among different organizations, even though each one uses its own unique weightings to calculate its Total Value.

THREE KEY DIMENSIONS OF VALUE

Economy, Effectiveness, and Efficiency

WHEN VALUE = ECONOMY, BEST PERFORMERS HAVE LOWEST COSTS.


Efficiency Best Performace

NOTE: THIS VALUE CHART SHOWS COMPANIES PARTICIPATING IN A CREWS BENCHMARKING STUDY.

WHEN VALUE = EFFICIENCY, BEST PERFORMERS HAVE HIGH KPI SCORES.


Efficiency Direction Of Value

KPIs = KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (SEE CREWS 4 KPI EXAMPLES IN MAINTENANCE & OPERATIONS)

BALANCED VALUE MEANS HIGH KPI SCORES + COST CONTROL …


Efficiency Balanced Value

… WHICH COMBINED WITH CUSTOMER MANAGEMENT …


Effectiveness Customer Management

… ACHIEVES TOTAL “3D” VALUE …


Achieves 3D Value

… BY OPTIMIZING ECONOMY, EFFICIENCY, AND EFFECTIVENESS ...

TOTAL “3D” VALUE

One advantage of the three-dimension approach is the separation of objective metrics (Costs and KPIs) from subjective measures (such as Customer Management). Objective metrics such as Costs and KPIs readily permit “apples-to-apples” comparisons among many different firms on an objective, impartial basis.


Cost Mertrics Objective

Subjective measures require a different methodology, however, in order to remove distortions that result from cultural and personal factors, which vary significantly among different organizations.

BENCHMARKING VALUE CHARTS

M&O VALUE CHART

The M&O function includes a wide range of different tasks, with numerous Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Each KPI is weighted by importance, with life safety highest and minor repairs & comfort issues lowest. The vector of higher value and angle of equivalent value reflects the relative weighting of costs and performance. Cost is rated higher than KPIs for this firm (Co. CL). For them, a higher value will require better cost control.


Maintenance and Operations

BENCHMARKING GAP ANALYSIS

M&O GAP ANALYSIS

This view of the Value Chart shows preliminary gap analysis in costs and performance for Company CL and its position on the Value Scale, based on weighted values for cost and performance KPIs. It also shows how Co. CL stacks up against “Best Performers” and the gaps that need to be closed to join them in Quartile #1.


Maintenance and Operations Gap Analysis

The white line indicates the path Co. CL can take in order to close these gaps and attain “Best Performer” status over a three-year period. For information on KPIs, and the specific, quantitative improvements needed, see “KPI Improvement Targets,” which will be issued in a subsequent chapter

BUILDING BLOCKS OF VALUE

KEY CREWS METRICS

Beginning with Space & Occupancy, a
hierarchy of Key Metrics helps to plan
and develop CREWS Value.

*CPRD: COST PER REVENUE DOLLAR, I.E.,
TOTAL CREWS COSTS / COMPANY REVENUE

Building Blocks Value

CONCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

We noted earlier that it’s essential to establish measurable goals and achievements. The three-dimensional approach we describe allows CREWS to go beyond a cost-only focus, in which it is viewed as a commodity, and subjected to constant cost-reduction efforts. Clear goals for efficiency and effectiveness, in measurable terms, make it is possible to plan, achieve and demonstrate value, and articulate a clear CREWS value proposition.

We’ve noted the difference between objective measures, such as costs and KPI scores, and subjective ones. Gaps often exist between customer priorities and performance levels in subjective areas. Another way to say it is that many organizations fail to “major on the majors.” Too many groups excel in areas that matter more to themselves than to their customers. This is why the third dimension is critical in attaining meaningful value.


Home of the Enterprise and Model of Value

HOW WE CAN HELP

We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of the leaders in their industries, who recognize the advantages of a leadership position. We provide them with rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of experience, plus our prior hands-on knowledge of the field.

We offer detailed comparisons in all three dimensions of Value: Economy, Efficiency, and Effectiveness. Our benchmarking evaluations compare Costs, Service Levels (KPIs), and Customer Satisfaction in the Workplace.

Our evaluations show how to raise performance while reducing costs, by establishing and attaining aggressive but achievable goals for the organization. We can tailor an evaluation to your own portfolio, facilities, workplace, workforce, and current management needs, and help you become the best performer.

THANK YOU!

Crew 7 Benchmarking

CREWS 5: Four Main Drivers Of Total Costs

OVERVIEW

DRIVERS OF TOTAL COSTS
How do we know:

• What is driving our Total Costs?
• What connects drivers with each other?
• How do we change upstream cost drivers?

In the classic axiom, if you want something good, fast, and cheap, you need to give up one of the three. This is why optimization is a core competency of the CREWS professional, who must properly balance three goals:

1. Effectiveness (High Quality)
2. Efficiency (Fast Delivery)
3. Economy (Low Costs)

This raises important basic questions, each with a strong impact on costs:

1. Are we achieving reasonable levels of quality in our service levels?
2. Are our service schedules and response times appropriate?
3. Does our space reflect the actual needs of the business?

There are many other, regular management practices which must be exercised for successful cost control, such as strategic outsourcing, regular budget reviews, bidding and cost reduction initiatives. The above questions, however, are often assumed to be answered at the right levels but levels may exceed the optimal balance.

For example, cleaning frequencies can be adjusted downward until an acceptable lower limit has been reached. Some areas may require little or no cleaning, and this can also be reflected in the contractual area (i.e. SF) being cleaned. Maintenance schedules can be changed from regular replacement of older equipment to a flexible, “Run To Intelligent Failure”mode (RTIF) for non-critical items such as bathroom exhaust fans.

COMPOUND COSTS

Achieving the right balance of compound factors has a cumulative benefit, somewhat like compound interest, which Albert Einstein called the “eighth wonder of the world.”

As an illustration, assume that rising costs of labor & materials (and perhaps interest rates) drive up the costs of CREWS services by (say) 10% in the current year. At the same time, assume the amount of space required also increases by 10%, due to returning workforces and a simultaneous desire for more personal distance between workspaces. Finally, include an additional 10% increase in cleaning, maintenance, employee services, utilities and other CREWS costs, due to the need for more frequent and/or increased levels of services.

Compounding these factors results in a total increase of over 33%, due to the effects of each on the others. The math is very simple, but can easily be overlooked if each of these challenges is addressed separately.

This is where Visual Management helps, by making such effects more obvious. Imagine a three-dimensional cube with three cost drivers of X (representing service levels), Y (for costs) and Z (for effective quality, i.e., customer satisfaction). Total volume represents Total Costs of three combined factors. Note: Total CREWS Costs actually have four main drivers to optimize: Services, Occupants, Space & Workplace.

Compound Costs Illustration
FOUR MAIN DRIVERS OF TOTAL COSTS
Four Main Drivers of Total Costs

SERVICES

ANALYZING COSTS

Each of these four factors has internal cost drivers which determine how much costs can be reduced. These can be considered arrows in the direction of cost increase. Services, for example, are driven largely by the scope of services offered, and by the levels of service provided. The product of these factors, multiplied by unit costs (per SF, per person, etc.) is the Total Cost for each service

Services

Scope of Services and Service Levels can be reviewed in detail to determine whether reductions are possible, either in the SF served (e.g. HVAC on vacant floors), or the level of service provided (control of downtimes, response times, workorder backlogs, unplanned corrective maintenance, etc.) See the example following.

Scope of Services

*Note: For lists of services other than Maintenance & Operations see previous chapters CREWS 3 & CREWS 4.

CONTROLLING AND REDUCING COSTS

As noted above, there are many management practices which must be exercised for successful cost control, such as strategic outsourcing, regular budget reviews, bidding and cost-reduction initiatives. There are, however, upstream factors which can be more important, but whose combined effects are easily overlooked.

Consider the scope of services, such as which areas on which floors are actually in need of HVAC, cleaning, etc., and which hours of operation. Review the level and frequency of services actually necessary for effective operation and usefulness. In this example, both scope and service level reductions of 15% are possible.

Reduction in Services Levels

The combined cost reductions equal 1 – (.85 x .85), or nearly 28%.

OCCUPANTS

OCCUPANTS

Internal cost drivers for Occupancy are complex. Some of them are addressed in other sections, such as services (discussed above), space requirements and workplace design (both discussed below). In this section, we examine the element of Time, which has become extremely important in the Covid and post-pandemic era.

People Working in the Office
ANALYZING OCCUPANCY

The diagram below graphically depicts an algorithm developed by Guerin Associates for its “Prismetrix” data management program. A large gap exists between Peak Occupancy (or “Net Equivalent Occupants”) and the number of workers who might appear on-site at any given time. This gap represents a significant opportunity.

Analyzing Occupancy

Capitalizing on this opportunity requires time-based data collection, documenting workspaces and population on-site over extended time periods, including 2nd or 3rd shifts if used. This enables flexible assignment of workspaces, reservations and time-sharing of spaces, team scheduling and disposition of excess workspace.

SPACE

SPACE

Space is the major factor when changes in a portfolio are being considered. Cost drivers escalate during the programming, design, construction and occupancy of facilities. As each phase is completed, changes become more expensive to execute. The most significant factor is Gross Square Footage (GSF), or exterior footprint of the building. This series of measures concludes with Net Assignable SF, the total SF of individual workspace.

Modern Building

The Gross / Net ratio varies dramatically from one building to another, between similar buildings of the same company, or even on the same campus. We refer to the ratio of Gross SF to Net Assignable SF as the GPA, or “Guerin Prism Average.” Analyzing what drives a high ratio requires more than traditional “rules of thumb.”

ANALYZING SPACE

This diagram illustrates the “Guerin Prism,” a graphic algorithm for in-depth analysis of space utilization. Each level generates data which is compounded at subsequent levels. Excessive space at any level is thus expanded by “markup factors” at the following levels, increasing the overall costs of design, construction, occupancy, operation and life cycle costs of facilities.

Analyzing Space

There are many reasons for a high GPA ratio, and most can be identified through a design peer review. For example, the Perimeter Area Ratio (Lineal feet of perimeter wall divided by the square root of the floor area) can indicate a very irregular footprint – something like gerrymandering. “Space is free and easy; walls are not.”

WORKPLACE

WORKPLACE

As workers return to offices, labs and other corporate spaces, they bring new attitudes and habits regarding work, new relationships with colleagues, and new ideas about what makes the Workplace worth returning to. Most companies are planning a “Hybrid” environment, allowing employees to plan flexibly around personal needs and schedules, and coordinate with co-workers to seamlessly plan collaborative, in-person sessions.

Office Space

Achieving the optimal fit between a facility and its occupants involves new considerations of timing, as well as the sizes and types of workspaces being provided. Different degrees of privacy, collaboration, and conference sessions of varying size are further complicated by the nature of work being done and even workers’ personalities.

ANALYZING THE WORKPLACE

Programs are emerging to help companies initiate, monitor and fine-tune the work / workplace / worker fit. The diagrams below provide a Taxonomy of terms and factors for selecting or self-performing these programs.

Analyzing the Workplace

TOTAL COSTS

BASELINE TOTAL COSTS

Each of these four factors shown has an impact on Total Costs, and each factor affects all of the others. Control of those costs can be viewed as an arrow representing reduction of each factor to its lowest acceptable level. Total Costs are the product of compounded costs, which then represent the lowest acceptable baseline.

Baseline Total Costs

The inner rectangle represents the effect of reductions in all factors. The reduced area (blue vs red) represents the Baseline Total Cost. The red area visible outside of the shape represents significant potential cost savings.

CONCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

We have noted earlier that it’s essential to establish measurable goals and achievements. For a successful effort, it’s important to establish a consistent set of measurement standards that will enable accurate analysis.

The measurements shown here are based on recognized and accepted standards. This is important in achieving “apples-to-apples” comparisons among your own facilities, and even more so when comparing with peer firms.

Once a data management program has been established, in-depth analysis of costs is possible. A consistent approach makes the compound cost analysis shown here easier. Addressing each factor separately, and then combining the mutual effects of each, makes a rigorous, disciplined approach to cost control attainable.

Home of the Enterprise
HOW WE CAN HELP

We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of them leaders in their industries, who recognize the need to retain a leadership position. We provide them with rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of experience, plus our prior hands-on knowledge of the field.

We offer detailed comparisons in all four of the areas above: Services, Occupancy, Space & The Workplace. Space utilization analysis has identified potential savings for clients valued in tens of millions of dollars.

Our evaluations show how to raise performance while reducing costs, by establishing and attaining aggressive but achievable goals for the organization. We can tailor an evaluation to your own portfolio, facilities, workplace, workforce and current needs, and help you become a best performer

THANK YOU!

Thank You Note

CREWS 4: Key Metrics in Space, Occupancy & Costs


OVERVIEW

KEY METRICS IN SPACE, OCCUPANCY COSTS
How do we know:

• How much space do we really need?
• How many net equivalent occupants do we have?
• How much more (or less) we should be spending?

Answers to these and many more key questions lie in your Key Metrics. Comparing with similar firms and facilities is the best way to identify your optimal targets, answer questions like those above, and identify major potential savings or improvements. Compiling data among dozens or even hundreds of sites can be problematic, especially in a dynamic corporate environment with frequent changes, relocations, mergers, acquisitions, or other types of change. Acquiring consistent data requires a long-term data management plan.

We use “Prismetrix," a comprehensive model of costs for the numerous services in facilities and real estate. Prismetrix provides an integrated overview of costs and linkages with Total Costs per SF and per Occupant. Once data has been compiled and validated, robust comparisons with benchmarks and with peer firms and facilities become possible. All metrics and measurements are based on recognized industry standards.

The superstructure of this model is the Guerin Prism, which illustrates key relationships in building design, workplace standards, and occupancy patterns within the organization’s facilities. Prism-based diagrams are "Parametric," meaning they are designed to illustrate changing data. They provide a “big picture” overview including all keyspace and cost data involved in the facility. This makes it possible to compare facilities side-by-side (or back-to-back), to highlight key differences at a glance.

Note: Some of the following material appeared earlier in “CREWS 3: Services & Organization." It has been updated and moved to this section to achieve a better fit with the subject and content.

PRISMETRIX: TOTAL SPACE & COST MEASUREMENTS

WHAT IS PRISMETRIX?

Prismetrix is GA’s unique, visually dynamic method of compiling, validating, comparing, and analyzing real estate and facilities management data in a clear, comprehensive way.

Prismetrix utilizes well-accepted cost categories and metrics to generate benchmarking data for

  1. Internal data documentation of progress
  2. Internal comparisons among sites or regions
  3. External benchmarking with peer companies

It is also extremely useful in setting up standard, recognized definitions for space, allocation of space by usage, scopes of facilities services, categories of internal and outsourced labor, etc.

Clear definitions are necessary to maintain consistent data over time, and enable “apples to apples” comparisons within and beyond the firm, It is also important to establish definitions that are most useful for internal management oversight rather than most useful to service providers.

Each vendor has its own system for cost tracking, or benchmarking using its own database Managers may then find that they need to maintain two sets of data, or can become overly dependent on their vendors. We recommend firms take the lead in their data management to preserve the greatest number of options in using, comparing, and improving results.

Notice: Prismetrix and the Guerin Prism are proprietary to Guerin Associates and confidential to their intended
recipients. These may be used 1. Internally, or 2. In public forums with acknowledgment of GA as the source. 3. Commercial use is permitted only with prior written permission from Guerin Associates.

PRISMETRIX: WORKPLACE SUPPORT

Workplace Support

PRISMETRIX: EMPLOYEE SERVICES

Employee Services

PRISMETRIX: BUILDING SERVICES

Building Services

PRISMETRIX: BUILDING SUPPORT

Business Support

THE GUERIN PRISM: THE WINDOW TO DESIGN ANALYSIS

The Window To Design Analysis

THE GUERIN PRISM: BUILDING, WORKPLACE & OCCUPANCY

THE FUNDAMENTALS

1. Some building designs are based on pre-established programs that generate space requirements. Supporting spaces are then developed and added, usually in the sequence shown, to complete the overall building plan.
2. Some footprints are established by an existing building envelope, or by the limitations of a particular site.

Building, Workplace & Occupancy

The diagram shown here illustrates the first of these methods, generating a Gross SF footprint through a series of successive “markups” of varying efficiencies. The resulting total can cover a wide range of Gross / Net ratios. We refer to this as the GPA (Guerin Prism Average). Total capital project costs are directly related to this ratio.
Note: This method is also reversible, to analyze the potential capacity of a fixed building envelope or site limits.

PRISMETRIX: BRINGING EVERYTHING TOGETHER

Bringing Everything Together

CONCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT
Once the Vision & Mission have been established, it’s essential to translate these into measurable goals and achievements. The absence of clear, achievable objectives makes failure to achieve them a virtual certainty. It’s critical, however, to establish a consistent set of measurement standards that will enable accurate analysis.

Our measurements are based on recognized and accepted standards used in publications of leading professional associations, such as IFMA, BOMA, ASTM, ANSI, R S Means, and numerous other sources.

The models we show here are based on many years of experience in measuring, comparing, and analyzing costs and performance for clients representing some of America’s top firms in their industries. These companies recognize that the future is a moving target. For them, continuous learning and improvement are not only unavoidable. They are actually essential to success.

Conclusion

HOW WE CAN HELP
We’ve conducted studies for a wide range of firms, many of the leaders in their industries, who recognize the need to retain a leadership position. We provide them with rigorous, thoughtful evaluations based on our 25+ years of experience, plus our prior hands-on knowledge of the field.

Our evaluations show how to raise performance while reducing costs, by establishing and attaining aggressive but achievable goals for the organization. We can tailor an evaluation to your own portfolio, facilities, workplace, workforce, and current needs, and help you become the best performer.

THANK YOU!

Thank You

CREWS 3: Services & Organization

Posted by Michael F. Guerin on Feb 23, 2022, 8:40 PM

OVERVIEW

“HOME OF THE ENTERPRISE / MODEL OF VALUE”
Adopting these or similar terms as Vision & Mission Statements for your CREWS department is a first step in improving or even restructuring your organization.

More important than the words chosen are the firm commitments made to improve performance and/or reduce costs. Successful goals share some important characteristics. They should be S-M-A-R-T:

Specific – Free of ambiguity or confusing terms
Measurable – Based on impartial, available data
Achievable – Realistic rather than idealistic
Relevant – Related to company & group goals
Time-Based – Not open-ended or evolving

We use a “Prismetrix” model illustrating Service Types (Hard and Soft), and a Hierarchy of Real Estate, Workplace, Value-Add, and Core FM Services.

We follow this overview with a comprehensive model of costs for each of these services, and an integrated overview with Total Costs per SF and per Occupant.

The superstructure of this model is the Guerin Prism, which illustrates key relationships in the design, furnishings, and occupancy patterns of the facilities.

 

3D Model of Value

In future issues, we will illustrate the corresponding “3D Model of Value,” a three-dimensional view of Economy, Efficiency, and Effectiveness. This model is represented by a three-dimensional cube.

 

Property Management

CREWS: SERVICES BY TYPE

CREWS: SERVICES BY TYPE

CREWS: SERVICES HIERARCHY

SERVICES HIERARCHY

CREWS: ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE

CREWS: ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE

THANK YOU!

 

CREWS 3: Thank You Box

CREWS 2: Critical Success Factors

Posted by Michael F. Guerin on Feb 14, 2022, 1:18 PM

INTRODUCTION

LOOKING WITHIN
Success depends on numerous factors,
not all within our control. One of our first
challenges is to identify things we can
control, in two major categories:

• Strengths
• Weaknesses

To do this, we examine a list of the positive
qualities – i.e., Critical Success Factors–
required to manage key responsibilities in
real estate & facilities management.

Analyzing our own performance, and
examining how well we implement
best practices, helps to confirm our
strengths, and to identify areas
where major improvement is possible,
and perhaps necessary.

Microscope

 

observatory

LOOKING BEYOND
We cannot advance until we know where
we stand vis-à-vis peer firms and facilities.
We need feedback from customers, service
providers and other sources that can help
us improve where it is most needed.
External feedback prepares us for:

• Opportunities
• Threats

One client that engaged in benchmarking
of sites internally against one another,
asked us to provide an outside perspective
with other firms. He wanted to know
whether his team was “best of the best”
or “best of the worst.” (Paraphrased for decorum) External input optimizes our
efforts for a balanced solution to closing gaps with best performers.

CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS

 

Critical Success Factors

Critical Success Factors

 

Read More

CREWS 1: The New Vision and Mission – Intro

Posted by Michael F. Guerin on Jan 28, 2022, 4:52:54 PM
 

INTRODUCTION
AN IMPORTANT MOMENT
This is an important moment in a relatively modern field known as real estate and facilities management.

Many current practitioners come from other fields and professions: Architecture, engineering, finance, manufacturing, research, etc. We believe most would agree it has been a rewarding experience but is also becoming extremely complex. An ever-expanding range of new and serious responsibilities is calling for New Vision, Missions, and Models for the field. Just a few recent examples include:

  • Security and cybersecurity against terrorist threats
  • New environmental, social and governance policies
  • Worker safety and wellness through a global pandemic
  • Hybrid workplace strategy in the post-pandemic world
  • Artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IOT)

Read More